The opening line: “When she was ten, Halima learned that she was possessed by a Jinni.” This makes Halima famous in no-time and as chance will have it, around the same time her clan is getting more and more powerful. Before long, Halima acts the part. This eventually takes her to the city, where the government consists solely of her clan-members.

Clear observations, clear consequences.

TAGS: short storySomalia

Tell me a Riddle

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